Categories
Computer Science

Expect the unexpected

When you design software you usually have a few use cases in mind, in the case of EpsilonGit the use case I keep coming back to is a project lead who wants an overview of how his team is working and how they are using their version control software.

Back in second year when I developed The JavaScript Orrery my target audience was David Parker and the only use of the software was to impress him for degree credit.

A short while later I made a few small adaptations to package the orrery as a Windows Store (now called Universal Windows) Application. I thought a few people might enjoy watching the planets go around the screen, but didn’t really expect too many people to download it. To be completely honest, I mainly packaged it as an app to get points for the App Builder Rewards competition.

I haven’t touched the orrery, packaged as Solar System Simulation on Windows, for years. However, I wrote a little while back about someone who used it to teach their daughter about space, an unexpected use but a nice one.

Today I got an email from a student in Brazil who wondered if the software had a function to see planet locations at specific dates, as he liked the simple 2D graphics and wanted to use them to make a tattoo of the layout of the solar system on his birthday. Strange, but cool.

Unfortunately the Solar System Simulation (which is a gratuitous name — its in no way even close to a ‘simulation’) doesn’t support this function — but its a cool idea, and one I wouldn’t have thought of.

It might be fun to add it in one day, and see how popular some of the ideas I have would be compared to those that a user has had and wanted to be implemented enough to go to the effort to email me about it. I suspect the user submitted ideas might be more popular, because no one knows how well a customer users your product as well as a customer. But I might be wrong, it could be an interesting bit of research.

So, expect the unexpected uses of your software and services — both in positive ways, such as odd-but-exciting use cases, and negative, such as malformed input — but also be excited by the prospect.

Danny

P.S ‘Solar System Simulation’ is still available and works on Windows 8, 8.1 and 10.

Categories
University

Year 3 Semester 2 Results

Today I received my final set of grades for my BSc (Hons) in Computer Science from the University of Hull – This included my two second semester modules, Mobile Devices and Application and Distributed Systems Programming, as well as my Final Year Project.

I achieved a grade of 85% in Mobile Devices and Applications, and 89% in Distributed Systems Programming.

The final year project was worth twice as many credits as each second semester, and so had more of an effect on the final grade. Thankfully I did quite well in the final year project, achieving a grade of 86%.

My overall weighted average for this year, including my first semester modules grades, is 86.5%.

This grade, weighted with my second year grades, means that my final grade for my degree as a whole is 86% – a very high first! I am of course over the moon with this.

I’d like to again say thank you to everyone who has made my time at university not only great for learning, but truly the best three years of my life (so far! :P). Particularly, but not limited to:

  • Rob Crocombe
  • Simon Watkins
  • Hayley Hatton
  • Russell Billingsley
  • Toby Russell
  • Jon Rich
  • Tom “Jeff” Procter
  • Special mention to “our American foreign exchange students”

 

  • Dr Martin Walker
  • Eur Ing Brian Tompsett
  • Rob Miles
  • Dr David Parker
  • Dr Peter Robinson

And of course anyone I spent time with in the labs or any of the many, many nights out in the first two years. Last but by no stretch of the imagination least thanks to my Mum, Dad, Brother and Sister for supporting me throughout the last 3 years.

I’m looking forward to trying to maintain this good score next year at York! Of course I will continue to do this blog throughout my time there too.

Danny

Categories
Programming University

2D Graphics Solar System Simulation Coursework Result

I’ve written a few posts now about my Solar System Simulation — also known as a JavaScript Orrey — Coursework for 2D Graphics. It was the coursework I’ve been most enthusiastic about since I’ve got to university so I was anxious to get my result.

I’m very pleased to say I got a grade of 86%. This is a high first class.

Because I’m pretty confident I did quite well in the other half of the module, User Interface Design, I think I should have a high first class for the Module as a whole, which I’m very happy about! Of course I will update this blog when I get my module grades back on the 18th of February.

The lecturer who set this coursework, Dr. David Parker, provided me with some really useful feedback, saying:

This was a well featured piece of work, I also love what you did turning it into an app (though that isn’t reflected above).

Some of the code is a little over complicated and you could put some thought towards how to make it simpler. This also has maintainability consequences.

Taking that into account I intend to spend much more of my programming time working on refactoring my code to make it easier to understand and maintain.

I was also very pleased that Dr Parker described my use of SVN, a subversion system used to keep track of changes to software source code over time, as the best he had seen. 🙂

Danny