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You should be using NSP

A few months ago I integrated the Node Security Platform into the continous integration system we use at pHQ. This week it picked up a vulnerability for the first time (don’t worry, its since been patched 😉) which meant that I was alerted to the vulnerability and provided with a link to read about ways to mitigate the risk involved until a patch was available. Had we paid for a subscription to NSP it would submit a pull request to update the package(s) with the fix as soon as it was available.

In the case shown in the screenshot above you can see that the pHQ platform didn’t directly rely upon the vulnerable package, but had 5 dependencies which included it one way or another. If you’re not automatically checking for vulnerabilities then you may not find them as you probably don’t know how many packages you indirectly depend upon!

If you’re not using node something like Snyk may support your language.

As Software Engineers our job may be seen as producing features for users, but we have a duty to ensure that what we develop is secure and won’t put peoples money or personal information at risk. A dependency vulnerbility checked is one great tool to have in the box.

Danny

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Promotion

Last week I was promoted to Lead Software Engineer at PepperHQ.

As part of the meeting we discussed what I want to achieve in the year ahead. There’s a lot and I’m looking forward to it.

I’m going to try to be a bit better at keeping the blog up-to-date with details of my day-to-day work going forward.

Danny

PepperHQ

The Pepper app for Vital Ingredient

In early September I decided I wanted to find a new role in which I could make more of an impact than at my previous jobs. After having spoken to the very enthusiastic CTO of PepperHQ, Andrew Hawkins, about a role as the Senior Software Engineer of the Pepper Platform I decided it would be the perfect place for me to make a mark.

Pepper build a series of iPhone and Android applications for resturants, retail and hospitality — primarily Coffee Shops at the moment — which allow users to pay for products and recieve awards for being a loyal customer.

In my mind the coolest use case of the Pepper Apps is CheckIn/Pay by balance. Imagine you work in Canary Wharf and visit the same Coffee Shop every morning to get your caffeine hit. Without Pepper you would have to go in, order your drink, wait for it to be made and then pay for it using cash or a credit card and, if you wanted to earn loyalty rewards, you would have to carry a flimsy bit of paper with you and get it stamped every morning — assuming you don’t lose it before you’ve collected enough stamps for a drink.

With Pepper you can automatically be “Checked in” to a location as soon as you are within a given distance of the store, perhaps just as you come out of the tube station. You can then make your order from your phone and have it ready for you as you get to the counter. Here’s the cool bit, you can just pick up your coffee and walk off. Checking in to the location earlier made your profile picture show up on the till in the store so the Baristas know that it’s your coffee. The payment is taken from your in app wallet (which can, optionally, be auto-topped up from your credit card, meaning you never have to think about it again). Your loyalty is also managed in-app.

Some Pepper Customers

Some Pepper Customers

Pepper is really one of those applications that makes the most sense when you see it in action and realise just how much time it would save someone who buys two or three coffees a week.

My role at the company is to be in charge of the pepper platform — all of the backend services, primarily Node.js, that manage the interaction of the applications and point of sales systems.

I’ve been at the company for 3 months now and am really enjoying my time here. It’s pretty neat to build a product people can see the value in, and that is available for use with companies that are household names.

So far in my time at Pepper I’ve added “Pseudo Currency” as a type of loyalty scheme, improved the development process by introducing Continuous Integreation, Linting and a Pull Request merge model using protected branches and started work on a series of improvements to the loyalty reward process.

I plan to keep the blog up-to-date with any developments at the new job.

Danny