Expect the unexpected

Solar System Simulation Windows 10

When you design software you usually have a few use cases in mind, in the case of EpsilonGit the use case I keep coming back to is a project lead who wants an overview of how his team is working and how they are using their version control software.

Back in second year when I developed The JavaScript Orrery my target audience was David Parker and the only use of the software was to impress him for degree credit.

A short while later I made a few small adaptations to package the orrery as a Windows Store (now called Universal Windows) Application. I thought a few people might enjoy watching the planets go around the screen, but didn’t really expect too many people to download it. To be completely honest, I mainly packaged it as an app to get points for the App Builder Rewards competition.

I haven’t touched the orrery, packaged as Solar System Simulation on Windows, for years. However, I wrote a little while back about someone who used it to teach their daughter about space, an unexpected use but a nice one.

Today I got an email from a student in Brazil who wondered if the software had a function to see planet locations at specific dates, as he liked the simple 2D graphics and wanted to use them to make a tattoo of the layout of the solar system on his birthday. Strange, but cool.

Unfortunately the Solar System Simulation (which is a gratuitous name — its in no way even close to a ‘simulation’) doesn’t support this function — but its a cool idea, and one I wouldn’t have thought of.

It might be fun to add it in one day, and see how popular some of the ideas I have would be compared to those that a user has had and wanted to be implemented enough to go to the effort to email me about it. I suspect the user submitted ideas might be more popular, because no one knows how well a customer users your product as well as a customer. But I might be wrong, it could be an interesting bit of research.

So, expect the unexpected uses of your software and services — both in positive ways, such as odd-but-exciting use cases, and negative, such as malformed input — but also be excited by the prospect.

Danny

P.S ‘Solar System Simulation’ is still available and works on Windows 8, 8.1 and 10.

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